The Ship 'MARY SHEPHERD"

I am continuing my search for a picture, painting or drawing of the Ship 'Mary Shepherd' the one above came from The National Library of New Zealand and I am grateful to have it - but  if a viewer has one or knows where there might be one I would dearly love to get a copy.

The National Maritime Museum at Greenwich holds the Lloyd's Survey Report made during construction of the Mary Shepherd (number SLD 6429). She was built for Joseph Shepherd by the James Briggs & Co yard at Sunderland. and William Budge was her first master. 

Built at Sunderland in 1858, The Mary Shepherd was a 'full rigged' Wooden Ship weighing 905 tons - Her Signal number was 1290 was rated A1 had three decks -draught was 21- was made of oregon , fastenings of copper and iron , and was sheathed in Copper in March 1872 at Boston, Massachusetts where she also underwent repairs and was surveyed in Sep 1872. . At that stage she was owned by Lidgett & Sons. Here dimensions were 168 x 34 x 22. Her then Captain was George Croot. And according to one book she was last seen at Boston in Feb 1873.

Note:  there was an earlier Mary Shepherd (a Clipper Ship) which was coated in metal  - as yet not sure what happened to it.

 The Mary Shepherd , Captained by William Budge ( who was the ship's first Master) , William Nichols First Mate, Issuer of Stores Douglas Clark, and with Surgeon Superintendent Dr. Clarence Chapman in charge of passengers welfare departed Plymouth on 10 Jan 1863 and arrived at Port Adelaide on 19 Apr 1863.  Sufficient food , water, medicines, etc were on board and no stoppages were made anywhere during the journey.  Chapman was assisted by Matron Elizabeth Robertson, School Master Thomas Hunter ( who neither the Captain or the Surgeon Superintendent was overly happy with) 

Dr Chapman also complained about the Ship's lighting and ventilation (both which he described as indifferent) and made some recommendations for improvements. Chapman appears to have been an interesting character and an intrepid traveller on ships. 

He was on board the "Plantagenet" which arrived in NSW in 1854 - and the "Speedy" which arrived in NSW on 9 April 1855.  The next time he shows up was on the "Ben Nevis" which arrived in NSW on 14 Jul 1856.  Just as well he wasn't on one of the later voyages as the Ben Nevis went down.  After that he was on the "Admiral Lyons" which arrived in NSW on 15 Sep 1857. Next up he was on the "John and Lucy" which arrived in Melbourne 11 Dec 1858. He was on the "Persia" which arrived in Brisbane on 3 Dec 1861. 

Was also on the same ship  Persia which 

Departed Hong Kong 19 March 1862. Arrived Georgetown 10 July 1862

In contrast, the Persia, the fourth ship of the same season, was apparently a floating battlefield and Mr. Chapman, the captain1, resorted to physical confinement, denial of food, and even caning, which was done by the captain himself to prevent any revenge being targeted at the crew. At the end of the voyage accusations were made against the captain and at a subsequent inquiry he explained that passengers embarked at four places — Hong Kong, Canton, Swatow and Amoy — and even before the vessel left Chinese shores there were bad feelings between the people from the different areas who spoke mutually incomprehensive dialects and who bore an inherent dislike each for the other. Many clashes took place between the factions. The Surgeon Superintendent could do little "when 500 Chinese were fighting all over her, on deck, in the ‘tween decks; yells and noises sufficient to stun you; billets of firewood, choppers, chopping-blocks, holystones, boards, iron bars, knives, etc., flying about, and glass bottles breaking in all directions." The captain’s testimony was confirmed by several of the crew as well as the interpreter. Despite the ruckus only 6 deaths occurred among the 531 passengers and James Crosby was again able to issue his upbeat report of another fine batch upon the ship’s arrival at Georgetown. [From Cane Reapers. Chinese Indentured Labourers in Guyana by Trev Sue-A-Quan.] Note 1: Clarence Chapman was in fact the Surgeon Superintendant.

On the "Mary Shepherd" in 1863 then the "Castle Eden" which arrived in NSW 1 Nov 1864 then the "Venilia" which arrived in NSW on 14 Oct 1865.  Probably if I look hard enough or manage to get a stroke of luck I might find some other ships on which he sailed.  There is a gap of a couple of years between 1858 and Dec1861 so that might well be a good place to start looking.

The remuneration schedule shows Clarence Chapman as receiving 377 pounds The Captain 37 pounds 14 shillings, The Chief Mate and Issuer of Stores each received 18 pound 17 shillings. 

The Role of Surgeon Superintendents

The Surgeon Superintendent was responsible to the government for the complete care of the immigrants, including their health, their education, and their moral welfare. He could over-ride the ship's captain if the occasion arose where the business interests of the ship's owners (which were the main concern of the captain) conflicted with the needs of the immigrants.

Looks to me like the Surgeon Superintendents collected around One pound sterling or maybe a Guinea [which for the uninitiated is one pound one shilling] for each passenger they managed to get to Australia in a reasonably fit and well state. Besides that they obviously had free passage and meals  so whilst not suggesting it might have been a bit of a junket [as he would have been on 24 hour call 7 days a week for several months at a time] he obviously had a liking for the lifestyle or he would not have participated in as many journeys as he did. 

The vessel sailed with 356 passengers on board plus 23 crew members and there were 4 Births during the journey and 2 Deaths ( 1 Adult Male and 1 Infant and cause of death in both cases due to gastric conditions)  Compared to other vessels travelling the same route at about the same time it speaks well for the way in which passengers were cared for. . 

Captain Budge wrote in his report "They are as rough a lot of Immigrants as I have ever had. The Cornish were large among the numbers. The single women have required a short hand on them which they have had. The Matron on leaving Plymouth was Elizabeth Robertson but she was found useless and Agnes Jamieson took her place. This little girl has behaved herself with great discretion and is certainly most deserving but a great many of the girls have given her abuse.  Alice Carey and Mary Jane McAlister have been guilty of problem conduct . Apr 13 Mary Ann Briggs has also been guilty of the same riotous conduct  . Throughout the voyage these girls have been very troublesome." He suggests a Viewing of  Daily Journal

Dr Chapman was still in South Australia  in late May 1863 . From the newspaper issue South Australian Register... Wednesday 27 May 1863, page 3. Article  - 1982 words

LEVEE AT GOVERNMENT HOUSE.

Clarence Chapman, Messrs. W. H. Camniell, J. O. Carlile, W. 15. Carter, W. 11. Charnock, J. Cherry, G. ... Marryat, Rev. J. Maughan, Dr. Moore (Colonial .Surgeon), Lieutenant Moller (?10th JtCi'uient), Major Mayo, ... A.D.C ? ....... Lieut Howard, R.N. The Collector of Customs, Major Douglas. The Colonial Surgeon,...

*****************************************************************************

 

Built at Sunderland, The Mary Shepherd was a 'full rigged' Wooden Ship weighing 905 tons -
 The Mary Shepherd , Captained by William Budge and with Surgeon Superintendent Dr. Clarence Chapman in charge of passengers welfare departed Plymouth on 10 Jan 1863 and arrived at Port Adelaide on 19 Apr 1863. Sufficient food , water, medicines, etc were on board and no stoppages were made anywhere during the journey. Chapman was assisted by Matron Elizabeth Robertson but she was found useless and couldn't cope  and was soon replaced by Agnes Jamieson. This little girl has behaved herself with great discretion and is certainly most deserving but a great many of the girls have given her abuse  School Master Thomas Hunter ( who neither the Captain or the Surgeon Superintendent was overly happy with) 


The vessel sailed with 356 passengers on board plus 23 crew members and there were 4 Births during the journey and 2 Deaths. 

Captain Budge wrote in his report " They are as rough a lot of Immigrants as I have ever had. The Cornish were large among the numbers. The single women have required a short hand and they have had it"

 

Her sister ship almost identical in construction was The Queen of the North - there were several ships with identical names - Lidgett's became the owners of the Mary Shepherd soon after the death of Joseph Shepherd - J. Lidgett was the executor of Joseph Shepherd's Will. 

QUEEN OF THE NORTH - 1857/1863
Master:  Captain D. Brown (1857); Captain Crombie (1863)
Rigging:  Ship; sheated in yellow metal in 1855 & 1861;  fastened with copper bolts
Tonnage:  858 tons using old measurements and 906 tons using new measurements.
Dimensions:  168 feet long, 33 foot beam and holds 21 feet deep; repairs to damages in 1858
Construction:  1855 in Sunderland
Owners:  Bradley & Co. (1857); Lidgett & Son (1863)
Port of registry:  Sunderland (1857); London (1863)
Port of survey:  Sunderland (1857); London (1863)
Voyage:  sailed for Aden (1857); New Zealand (1863)

Later on in Melbourne on another voyage


Mary Shepherd. Full rigged ship, 905 tons. Built Sunderland, 1858. Having arrived from London a week previously, was only partly unloaded when she caught fire while berthed at Hobson Bay Railway Co.’s pier at Sandridge, Melbourne, 2 July 1871. The tug Sophia managed to tow her out from the pier and she was scuttled in four fathoms off Town Pier. The Mary Shepherd was later raised and repaired ‘after great difficulty’. [WPP] 

Later still in New Zealand 

Genealogical Society. "Mary Shepherd" List of assisted immigrants to Canterbury on the "Mary Shepherd. 1953. Book. The Mary Shepherd, 920 tons, sailed from London 12 May, 1873 and arrived Lyttelton 20 August. She made four voyages to Auckland and one voyage to Lyttelton. Christchurch City Libraries NZ Collection Article 


List of assisted immigrants to Canterbury per the "Mary Shepherd", 12 May 1873 FHL catalog

The following information would appear to be accurate but how she got from Boston to London in time to deliver 200 emigrants to New Zealand is a mystery.  She was repaired, coated in  copper and resurveyed at Boston in 1872 under the command of George Croot, and the report of her sighting in Boston would appear to have been inaccurate. And She sailed from London under the command of Captain Caroline on March 12th 

Yellow metal consisted of 60% copper, 40% zinc and a little tin. The sheathing being held in place by copper nails.

Coppered: The hull of a wooden vessel sheathed below the waterline to prevent the damage caused by ships' worms (Teredo worm) and also the build-up of weed and barnacles which lessened the ships speed. A very expensive operation. What kept the worm out was the hot tar and felt that was used on the hulls to act as an insulation from the copper. Copper-sheathed vessels are quite free from its attack. Worms also avoided wood impregnated with iron rust while copper paint, coal tar frequently applied has the same effect. Vessels fitted with copper bottoms handled much better. Between 1777 -1780 the whole British Navy was coppered. Some few years after copper sheathing became general but the copper reacted with the iron fastenings. Copper, instead of iron bolts, were ordered to be used in all the ships.

 

ARRIVAL OF THE MARY SHEPHERD.

From the "Lyttelton Times," August 21, 1873

Arrived-August 20, Mary Shepherd, Caroline, from London. Passengers, 200 emigrants.

The Mary Shepherd, Captain Caroline, came to an anchorage in Lyttelton harbour yesterday afternoon, after a passage of 100 days from Start Point. She was boarded by the immigration commissioners, together with Dr. Donald, health officer, who were conveyed thither by the s.s. Gazelle. On going on board all was found well, and the vessel admitted to pratique. The vessel appeared to be extremely clean, and the immigrants seem to be of a superior class. They will be disembarked today.

The Mary Shepherd left London on Mar 12 with Government emigrants for Port Lyttelton as follows: -English, 118 males, 119 females: Irish, 17 males, 52 females: Scotch, 11 males, 12 females: equal to 290½ adults and 350 souls, of which 72 were boys and 47 were girls, say 119 children. There were three deaths of children between twelve and fifteen months old, and seven births (three of them off the port, two of which were stillborn)> The ship made a fine passage to the equator of twenty-six days, crossing in longitude21.25 on June 7 at 5 p.m., the average of passages of 1000 ton vessels to that part of the ocean being twenty-nine days. She passed the Snares and Traps on August 14, being out 94 days.

After this period no trace of the vessel can be found.  

 

NOT ANY MORE

WRECK OF THE MARY SHEPHERD.

 

1874 - NO DATE - Via New Zealand

A recent telegram reported the wreck of the Ship Mary Shepherd. The vessel has been several times to Auckland under Capt. Peek, and is well known at the various ports of tho colony. She was owned by Messrs Lidgett and Co., of London, tho owners of the barque Columbus, now in Auckland harbor, and whose master, Capt. Esaon, handed to the "Herald" the following brief record of the disaster : — The mail just in from Manilla brings an account of the wreck of tho British ship Mary Shepherd, which sailed from Mauritius on April 10th, in ballast, for Manilla, And which struck on a reef south of Manilla Bay about tho middle of Juno. She broke up so rapidly that there was no time to got the boats out, but the mate and 17 of the crew managed to get on shore. The master (Captain Carolina), the cook (White), and two apprentices named' Thurmen and Smith, failed to reach land and were all drowned. In the morning, the survivors found they were on Luban Island, south of Manilla Bay 5 and in a day they were received on board a small coaster and taken into Manilla. The Mary Shepherd was built of wood at Sunderland in 1858. 




A Life on the Ocean Wave

A life on the ocean wave! A home on the rolling deep!
Where the scattered waters rave, and the winds their revels keep!
A life on the ocean wave! A home on the rolling deep!
Where the scattered waters rave, and the winds their revels keep!
Like an eagle caged I pine, on this dull unchanging shore.
Oh give me the flashing brine! The spray and the tempest roar!
A life on the ocean wave! A home on the rolling deep!
Where the scattered waters rave, and the winds their revels keep!
The winds, the winds, the winds their revels keep!
The winds, the winds, the winds their revels keep!

The land is no longer in view, the clouds have begun to frown
But with a stout vessel and crew we'll say let the storm come down!
The land is no longer in view, the clouds have begun to frown
But with a stout vessel and crew we'll say let the storm come down!
And the song of our hearts shall be, while the winds and waters rave.
A life on the heaving sea! A home on the bounding wave!
A life on the ocean wave! A home on the rolling deep!
Where the scattered waters rave, and the winds their revels keep!
The winds, the winds, the winds their revels keep!
The winds, the winds, the winds their revels keep!

 

 

******************************************

 

 

'Far away-oh far away-
We seek a world o'er the ocean spray!
We seek a land across the sea,
Where bread is plenty and men are free,
The sails are set, the breezes swell-
England, our country, farewell! farewell!