Shane Warne

 
 

Shane Warne
Facts in Brief

 

Shane Keith Warne was born on 13th September 1969 in Ferntree Gully, Victoria.

 
His parents Brigitte and Keith lived in Ferntree Gully before moving to Hampton and then Black Rock.
 
Shane's childhood ambition was always to play league football for St. Kilda in the VFL.
 
He spent a lot of his childhood playing sport in the backyard with his younger brother Jason.
 
His childhood idols were AFL stars Trevor Barker (St. Kilda) and Dermott Brereton (Hawthorn).
 


What a cutie!

 
Shane played his first cricket match for East Sandringham at the age of 9 years.
 
Shane began school at Sandringham Primary School before moving on to Hampton High for Years 6, 7 and 8.
 
He was awarded a sports scholarship to Mentone Grammar where he completed his final three years of schooling.
 
Shane was not an academic student. He talked a lot in class and teachers described his behaviour as flamboyant.
 
While he was at school, Shane spent time playing for Brighton Cricket Club at sub-district level.
 


Victorian Schoolboys

 
When he left school, he transferred to the St. Kilda Cricket Club where he first played in the First XI in 1988-89.
 
Up until his late teens, football was always his first sporting love. Cricket and tennis enjoyed their moments but football was his first love.
 
Shane played for the St. Kilda Under 19 team and played one game at Reserves level. He was cut by St. Kilda before the 1989 VFL season.
 
It was only after his separation from St. Kilda that Shane seriously turned his attention to cricket.
 
Shane decided to spend the 1989 Australian winter playing club cricket in Bristol, England.
 


Pimples and spikes

 
It was while he was playing in Bristol that Shane first encountered a problem with his weight. He put on about 20 kg during that time.
 
In 1990, Shane attended the Australian Cricket Academy in Adelaide.
 
In the eight months he spent at the academy, Warne displayed enormous potential. However his attitude to diet, fitness and discipline was a constant problem.
 
His Academy experience provided the first opportunity for Shane to be influenced by former Australian leg-spinner, Terry Jenner who would become Warne's long time friend and mentor.
 
Shane left the Academy soon after being left out of the Academy's team to tour Sri Lanka. Academy officials cited disciplinary reasons for Shane's omission.
 


1991: Accrington CC

 
Although it has long been claimed that he was dismissed from the Academy for disciplinary reasons, Shane maintains that he left of his own free will.
 
He maintains that while the Academy team was away, he was very close to being selected to make his First Class debut for South Australia in the Sheffield Shield competition.  Warne decided to return home and play for his home state of Victoria.
 
Soon after leaving the Academy, Warne was selected in Victoria's Sheffield Shield team to play Western Australia at the Junction Oval in Melbourne from February 15th-18th 1991.
 
He finished the match with bowling figures of 0/61 and 1/41. His first and only First Class victim was Tom Moody who was caught by Damien Fleming for 73.
 
In 1991, Warne was selected in an Australia B team to tour Zimbabwe in September. The team was managed by former player John Benaud and captained by Mark Taylor.
 


Mentor: Terry Jenner

 
Warne had a very successful Zimbabwe tour, capturing eleven wickets including 7 for 49 in the final match.
 
In December 1991, Warne was selected to play for an Australian XI in a four day match against the touring West Indies in Hobart.
 
He finished that match with figures of 3/14 and 4/42. He helped the Australian XI to a surprise victory by an innings and 93 runs.
 
A week later, Warne was named in the Australian team for the 3rd Test against India at the Sydney Cricket Ground, commencing on January 2nd 1992.
 
After only five First Class matches and a total of 15 First Class wickets, the 23 year old Warne made his Test debut taking 1/150 off 45 overs.
 


Shane and his mother after his selection for  his 1st Test

 
The only wicket in that debut was that of Ravi Shastri who was caught by Dean Jones for 206.
 
In the 4th Test of that series against India, Warne struggled again, this time in Adelaide. His figures of 0/18 and 0/60 failed to save his place in the team. He was dropped to 12th Man for the 5th Test in Perth.
 
Following the India series, Warne was invited back to the Academy by Rod Marsh. This time Warne worked hard on both fitness and technique. He spent a lot of time with former Test leg-spinner Terry Jenner.
 
In 1992, Shane met wife-to-be Simone at a golf tournament.
 
In August 1992, Warne was selected for a short tour of Sri Lanka.
 


Shane & Simone: 1993

 
After a quiet start to the  First Test in Colombo, Warne took 3 for none in the 2nd innings with his last eleven balls. He helped dismiss Sri Lanka for 164. It was a most unexpected victory for the Aussies by 16 runs.
 
Although the rest of the Sri Lankan tour remained less spectacular, Warne once again did enough to be named in four of the five home Tests against the touring West Indies in the 1992-93 season.
 
After missing the first Test of that series, Warne was selected to play in front of his home town crowd in the second Test at the MCG. After taking 1/65 in the  first innings, Warne bounced back in the second innings. The West Indies were set a target of 359 to win the Test. At 1/143 they looked an outside chance, until Warne ripped through them. He took 7/52 as the Windies were dismissed for 219.
 
In the remaining three  Tests against the West Indies, Warne struggled once again and returned the figures of 2/196 over the three matches.
 
One of the biggest disappointments in Warne's Test career was losing the 4th Test against the West Indies in Adelaide by one run. This enabled the Windies to tie the series 1-1. They also went on to win the Fifth Test in Perth and the Series 2-1. It would be the only home series defeat of Warne's career.
 


Shane playing for his beloved Victoria in the domestic Pura Cup competition.

 
In February and March 1993, Warne toured New Zealand and played in all three Tests.
 
He took 3/23 and 4/63 in the 1st Test in Christchurch, 2/59 and 2/49 in the 2nd Test in Wellington and 4/8 and 2/54 in the 3rd Test in Wellington.
 
Warne made his One Day International (ODI) debut for Australia on 24th March 1993. It was in the 3rd ODI played at the Basin Reserve in Wellington. Warne made 3 runs and took 2/40 from his ten overs.
 
In 1993, Shane was selected in the Australian squad for the Ashes tour of England.
 
Up until the first Test in Manchester, Shane had been struggling to secure a permanent place in the Australian team.
 


Ian Healy celebrates the "Ball of the Century."
Gatting looks confused!

 
His first ball in an Ashes Test was described as the "Ball of the Century." At Old Trafford in Manchester, Warne delivered the perfect leg break to former England skipper, Mike Gatting. The ball drifted to the leg-side, dipped sharply, pitched outside leg stump, spun viciously and hit the off stump. Gatting looked amazed and uncertain about what had just happened. That one ball was the beginning of a long period of domination that Warne seemed to exert over English batsmen in particular.
 
On that tour, Warne went from strength to strength. He played in all six Tests taking 34 wickets at an average  of 25.79, and scoring 113 runs at an average of 32.66. In all other First Class matches on tour, Warne took another 41 wickets at 19.98. Overall on tour, he took 75 First Class wickets at an average of 22.61.
 
In January 1994, Warne is fined by the ICC after on-field abuse of the departing Darryl Cullinan in a match against South Africa.
 
Warne took his 100th Test wicket when he dismissed Brian McMillan in the 3rd Test against South Africa at the Adelaide Oval on 1st February 1994. It was Shane's 23rd Test match.
 
In 1994 Warne was named Wisden Cricketer of the Year after becoming the leading wicket-taker in all three series he played in, rounding off with a hat-trick against England in Melbourne to help Australia retain the Ashes. 
 


Fashion statement!

 
He was also chosen as one of the five Wisden Cricketers of the Year for 1994. The others were David Boon, Ian Healy, Merv Hughes, Shane Warne, Steve Watkin.
 
In November 1994, Warne recorded his career best figures in the 1st Test against England in Brisbane. His victims were Atherton, Stewart, Hick, Thorpe, Gooch, DeFreitas, Gough and McCague.
 
Although, Warne dominated most batsmen from most countries, it was the Indian players who coped fairly well against Warne. His overall bowling average against India (47.18 runs per wicker) was over 20 points higher than his average overall (25.41 r/w)
 
In December 1994, Warne took a hat trick in the 2nd Test against England at the MCG. His victims are Philip DeFreitas, Darren Gough and Devon Malcolm.
 
In 1995, Mark Waugh and Warne were fined by the ACB, now Cricket Australia, after admitting they supplied pitch and weather information to an Indian bookmaker. The ACB covered up the scandal, but the media exposed it three years later.
 


Wedding bells: 1995

 
In September 1995, Shane married Simone Callahan at the historical homestead, Como House in South Yarra.
 
Shane took his 200th Test wicket when he dismissed Chaminda Vaas in the 1st Test against Sri Lanka at the WACA, Perth on 11th December 1995. It was Shane's 42nd Test match.
 
Warne is setback by injuries during 1996. After receiving treatment on his shoulder, he required surgery on his major spinning finger. As a result he missed a short tour of India.
 
Shane was named Captain of the Victorian State side for the 1996-97 season.
 
In 1996, Shane Warne experienced one of his worst defeats in the World Cup Final against Sri Lanka in Lahore, India.
 


Warne: 1st Test 1991

 
Warne took his 100th ODI wicket when he dismissed Junior Murray in a match against West Indies at the MCG on 6 December 1996. It was Shane's 60th ODI match.
 
In 1997, Warne captained the Australian one-day side for the first time, standing in for Steve Waugh.
 
In 1997, Warne is runner up in the International Cricketer of the Year Award.
 
In 1997, Warne passed Richie Benaud's record of 248 Test wickets to become the most successful Australian spinner in Test cricket.
 
From June to August 1997, Warne took 24 Test wickets and scored 188 useful runs after Australia fought back from the disappointment of losing the first Test to retain the Ashes in England.
 


1977: Victory dance

 
After Australia retained the Ashes in 1997, Warne showed his delight with his rather infamous victory dance at Trent Bridge, wiggling his hips and brandishing a stump on the dressing room balcony.
 
Shane scored his 1000th run in Test cricket in the 6th Test against England at Kennington Oval, London on 22nd August 1997. It was Shane's 58th Test match.
 
In 1997, he became the greatest spinner of all time after passing Lance Gibbs' total of 309 Test wickets.
 
Warne took his 300th Test wicket when he dismissed Jacques Kallis in the 2nd Test against South Africa at the SCG, on 5th January 1998. It was Shane's 63rd Test match.
 
During the 1998-99 season, Warne Captained Australia for ten one-day internationals. 
 


Where are the locks?

 
During 1998, Warne and Mark Waugh admitted they had been paid to provide pitch and weather reports to an Indian bookmaker during Australia's tour of Sri Lanka four years earlier.
 
In July 1998, Warne undergoes a career-threatening shoulder operation. Warne is told by surgeons that he might never play cricket again after that operation.
 
Shane took his 200th ODI wicket when he dismissed Moin Khan in a World Cup match against Pakistan at Lords on 20 June 1999. It was Shane's 125th ODI match.
 
In the 1999 World Cup, Warne's late wickets help lift Australia to an unforgettable tie in their World Cup semi-final with South Africa.  This was enough to take them into the final against Pakistan. A match Australia won easily. Warne was named Man of the Match in both games.
 
In April 1999, after returning from shoulder surgery and a broken finger in the final Ashes Test of 1998-99, Warne is dropped for the last game in the West Indies as the selectors prefer Stuart MacGill. It is the only time the selectors felt that way.
 


Lethal combo !
Gilchrist and Warne

 


Time for reflection
 

Part 1

When Shane Warne walked off the Sydney Cricket Ground on January 5th 2007, the international career of one of the greatest players of all time came to a sudden and premature end. Not only was Warne a great player, but he was clearly the most controversial and colourful figure in world cricket at the time.

During his fifteen year international career, Warne established himself as the greatest leg-spinner in the long history of the game. In fact, many cricketing experts have declared Warne the greatest bowler of all time. And you get no argument from anyone at Sports Card World on that score!

Since his rather inauspicious Test debut in 1991, Warne has arguably had the most profound influence on the game of cricket than any other player since Sir Donald Bradman. Warne entered the Test arena at a time when the fast bowlers of the world, particularly the West Indian variety, had dominated the game for almost two decades. Warne rejuvenated the almost extinct art of leg-spin bowling, and  quickly became an integral part of one of the most balanced and lethal bowling attacks in world cricket.

During Warne's career, Australia climbed the international rankings to become the most dominant team in world cricket. Sure, players such as Ricky Ponting, Glenn McGrath, Adam Gilchrist, Matthew Hayden, Steve Waugh, Mark Waugh, Justin Langer and company were all prime movers in Australia's surge to power. But the contribution of Shane Warne was a vital and dynamic ingredient in that overall success.

There is one certain aspect about Warne's   career   that   is    undeniable.

Above right: Warne leaves his beloved Melbourne Cricket Ground after scoring 40 not out against England in December 2006. It was Warne's last Test at the MCG.

Whenever he was about, nothing was dull, boring or routine. On the field, he persistently tormented opposition batsmen. This was achieved with either the line, length, drift and spin of his bowling or the sharp, caustic, witty and cutting remarks of his constant 'sledging'. There was no respite. Sooner or later, Warnie would get inside the heads of opposition players.

Off the field, Warne appeared to possess an almost insatiable desire to self destruct. Controversy seemed to follow Warne like a blood-hound. Bookmakers and betting scandals, banned substances, suspensions, infidelity, smoking, weight gain and sleazy phone and text messages all reared their ugly heads. Although these indiscretions damaged his reputation and cost Warne his marriage and most likely, the Australian captaincy, they had little negative effect on his performances on the field. To the average Australian cricket fan, the off-field adventures were quickly forgotten. Warne was simply the loveable larrikin who helped steer the Aussies to victory after victory.

Sports Card World recognizes the unique genius of Shane Warne. We are proud to present this tribute to a legend of the game. A very special cricketer who chose to specialize in what is generally regarded as the most difficult skill in cricket. Not only did Warne master the art of leg-spin bowling, but he also took it to new and unexplored levels that had previously been deemed impossible.

Warne is a picture of concentration as he watches the flight of another delivery.

Shane Warne is congratulated by skipper Steve Waugh during a World Cup ODI.


Shane makes his announcement at the Melbourne Cricket Ground

When news leaked out, in mid-December 2006, that Shane Warne was expected to announce his retirement within a few days, shockwaves were felt in cricketing circles all around the world. Here in Australia, the news was completely unexpected and cricket fans were in a state of disbelief. The thought of Shane Warne retiring was almost too horrid to contemplate. After all, history had demonstrated that most leg spin bowlers do not reach their peak until their mid thirties. So experts and fans believed that, even at the age of 37, Shane Warne still had a few productive years ahead of him. Furthermore, his recent form, particularly against England, had been outstanding and he was bowling as well as ever.

By the time Warne made the announcement on Thursday 21st December, the shockwaves had abated a little, but the feelings of disbelief lingered on. In front of a packed press conference at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, Warne announced:-

"A lot of people said you'll know when your time's up, you'll know when the time's right and I sort of doubted that, I didn't really understand what they meant, and I sit here in front of you today, and I know exactly what they mean, and my time is now and I couldn't have asked for things to go any better and the script, I suppose, leading up to these last two test matches, I'm gonna retire at the end of the Sydney test match.

The reason for doing it that way, I wasn't going to do anything ahead of the team, the team always came first and once the urn was back then it was going to be time to announce retirement, if that had to wait until the end of the Sydney test match then it would be then, but as it's worked out and the script has been written 3-0 we've got the urn back from Perth, the opportunity to play out here at the MCG in front of my family and friends who I've grown up and spent a lot of time with and then Sydney where it all started 16 cricket seasons ago or nearly 20 odd years of first class cricket ago, started at Sydney and still my proudest moment playing my first test match was an amazing feeling so to have that opportunity to walk off  in  Sydney  where  it all  began  a

long time ago and the ride began then I think thatís a great opportunity and something to celebrate with the team, my team-mates we've been in it together this last little journey since we lost the Ashes where it was a real mission for all of us in the team, the Australian cricket team, to get that urn back.

I sit here today with every single trophy available in international cricket in the Cricket Australia offices so I think as a player I would like to think I played my part in helping those trophies getting to Cricket Australia, I sit here today a very happy man.

It's been sort of on my chest for while, probably would have retired at the end of the 2005 ashes series had we won, but it wasn't to be, my life has been unbelievable to be honest, it's you know, cricket is a statistic based game but its not about statistics and money and financial and those types of things to me if it was about that sort of stuff I would keep playing, so I feel like I'm still bowling well enough to keep playing, it's about knowing the right time and I like to go out on top, I think I'm going out on my terms, I'd like to think I've earned that right to go out on my terms but it's a day of celebration, celebrating a wonderful ride and that's basically why we are here today."

Shane Keith Warne was born on 13th September 1969. His parents, Brigitte and Keith lived in Ferntree Gully, an outer eastern suburb of Melbourne, Victoria. Although the family moved about in Shane's early years, it was a very normal suburban life for the Warne family.

Both of Shane's parents were sporty at heart and loved the outdoor life. Shane quickly developed a love of sport and from an early age displayed excellent coordination and ball skills. Cricket, football and tennis were among the favourite pastimes for Shane and his younger brother, Jason. They spent hours imitating their sporting heroes in typical Aussie backyard contests.

When the family moved to Hampton and then on to Black Rock, Shane began to support the Saint Kilda Football Club in the Victorian Football League. Shane's earliest sporting ambition was to play VFL football for St. Kilda and emulate his childhood heroes, Trevor Barker and Hawthorn's Dermott Brereton. He never really considered cricket as an alternative until his late teens. The beach side suburb of Black Rock also provided the opportunity for Shane to develop his love for the beach and surfing.

Longest Serving Fans

Shane with his parents

Brigitte and Keith Warne

Shane's childhood was a very happy time. Although, his parents encouraged and supported his sporting interests, they were never the type to push him.  He began his schooling at Sandringham Primary School and played his first cricket match with the East Sandringham Cricket Club when he was just nine years of age. After completing Years 6, 7, and 8 at Hampton High School, he was offered a sports scholarship to attend Mentone Grammar. Shane spent his final three years of school at Mentone. He was selected in the First XI at the age of 15 and was captain in his final year. In those three years, he captured 54 wickets and made over 500 runs. Although Shane excelled on the sporting field, his academic achievements never quite reached the same lofty levels. In the classroom he had a lot to say and his teachers politely described his behaviour as "flamboyant."

Shane spent some time playing cricket at the Brighton CC at sub-district level. After he left school, he moved on to play for the St. Kilda Cricket Club and was later selected in the First XI for the 1988-89 season. But his first love was football and his burning ambition was still to achieve his boyhood dream of a Victorian Football League career. Although he played with some success for St. Kilda Under 19s during the 1997 season and played one Reserves game the following season, he was absolutely devastated when he was cut from their programme, prior to the 1989 AFL season. Perhaps if he'd been a little quicker or slightly taller, things might have been different.


Warne (2nd from right) celebrates a win for the St. Kilda U/19s

In a strange quirk of fate, Shane now turned his main interests to cricket, and he decided to spend the 1989 Australian winter playing club cricket in Bristol, England. It was a great experience for the young Aussie who played hard, both on and off the field. Although he enjoyed the cricket and social life, his life-style resulted in a significant gain of almost 20kg in weight. It was the beginning of a problem that would haunt him for the rest of his career.

In 1990, Shane accepted an invitation to attend Australia's Cricket Academy in Adelaide and arrived there in April. It would be fair to say that during the eight months he spent at the academy, Warne hardly endeared himself to the coaching staff. Although he displayed enormous potential, his attitude to diet, fitness and discipline was less than perfect. When the Academy announced the team to tour Sri Lanka in late 1990, Warne was left out for disciplinary reasons. Upset and annoyed about his omission, Warne decided to leave the Academy and head back to Victoria in January 1991. Much has been written about the reasons for Warne's departure. Although it has long been held that Warne was dismissed for disciplinary reasons, Warne disputes this claim. He maintains that he left of his own free-will.


Shane pictured with friend and mentor, Terry Jenner

Warne's Academy experience wasn't a total disaster. It would be fair to say that Warne learnt a great deal during his time at the Academy. It also provided the first opportunity for Shane to be influenced by former Australian leg-spinner, Terry Jenner who would become Warne's long time friend and mentor. Jenner understood the art of bowling and built a rapport with his young pupil. Warne was receptive to Jenner's style of imparting knowledge. It was the beginning of a long and fruitful partnership between the two wrist spinners.

A short time after his return home from the Academy, Warne was selected in Victoria's Sheffield Shield team to play Western Australia at the Junction Oval in Melbourne from February 15th-18th 1991. It was a most inauspicious First Class debut for the 22 year old spinner who made 20 runs in his only innings and finished the match with bowling figures of 0/61 and 1/41. His first and only victim was Tom Moody who was caught by Damien Fleming for 73.

Having already experienced an overseas tour to the West Indies with an Australian Youth team captained by Jamie Cox a year before, Warne was to receive more international experience in 1991, when he was selected in an Australia B team to tour Zimbabwe in September. The team was managed by former player John Benaud and captained by Mark Taylor. Warne had a very successful tour, capturing eleven wickets including 7 for 49 in the final match.


After Shane's start to his Test Career, few people thought he was going to be the first to capture 700 Test wickets.

Then in December 1991, Warne was selected to play for an Australian XI in a four day match against the West Indies in Hobart. Warne bowled well and with match figures of 3/14 and 4/42 helped the Australian XI to a surprise victory by an innings and 93 runs. Although five of his victims were tail-enders, Warne did come out of the match with the scalps of Brian Lara and Carl Hooper. It certainly must have impressed the Australian selectors, because a few days later, Warne was named in the Australian team for the 3rd Test against India at the Sydney Cricket Ground, commencing on January 2nd 1992.

After only five First Class matches and a total of 15 wickets, the 23 year old Warne entered the Test arena proudly wearing his baggy green cap for the first time. It was an experience that Shane would never forget. After Australia batted first and made 313 (Warne made 20), India replied with 403 thanks to 206 from Ravi Shastri and 148 n.o. from Sachin Tendulkar. Although Warne didn't bowl badly, he did come up against two form players who had little fear of spin bowling. With

figures of 1/150 off 45 overs, Warne had once again struggled in a debut match.

In the 4th Test of that series against India, Warne struggled again, this time in Adelaide. His figures of 0/18 and 0/60 failed to save his place in the team, and he was dropped to 12th man for the 5th and final Test in Perth. Although Warne failed to take wickets in his first two Tests, the Australian selectors were clearly impressed by not only his ability to bowl accurately for sustained periods, but also by the amount of spin he could impart on the ball. With this in mind, he was invited back to the Academy by Rod Marsh. This time, Warne took the up the challenge more seriously. He gave up drinking beer, and started early morning running together with swimming, boxing and regular work in the gym. He lost around two stone and spent most of the winter of 1992 practising his bowling techniques with Terry Jenner.

Soon after, Warne was named in the Australian squad to tour Sri Lanka in August and September 1992. The first Test in Colombo was to be a turning point in Warne's career. For more details of this match, see Great Career Moments below. Although the rest of the tour remained less spectacular, Warne once again did enough to be named in four of the five home Tests against the touring West Indies in the 1992-93 season.

After missing the first Test of that series, Warne was selected to play in the second Test at the MCG. Spurred on by fantastic home town support, Warne gave his first real indication of the impact he was to have on cricket over the next one and a half decades. After taking 1/65 in the  first innings, Warne showed his true colours, as the pitch began to take turn in the second innings. The West Indies were set the target of scoring 359 to win the Test. At 1/143 they looked an outside chance until Warne ripped through them. Warne took 7/52 as the Windies were dismissed for 219. In the remaining three  Tests, Warne struggled once again and returned the figures of 2/196 over the three matches.

Portraits across a Career

Near the start of his career

At the end of his career

In February and March 1993, Warne toured New Zealand and played in all three Tests. It was Shane's best and most consistent series so far. He took 3/23 and 4/63 in the 1st Test in Christchurch, 2/59 and 2/49 in the 2nd Test in Wellington and 4/8 and 2/54 in the 3rd Test in Wellington. It was also on this tour, that Warne made his One Day International (ODI) debut for Australia. It was in the 3rd ODI played at the Basin Reserve in Wellington. Warne made only 3 and took 2/40 from his ten overs.

When the Australian team returned home from New Zealand, the focus quickly turned to the up-coming 1993 Ashes tour of England. Six Tests and three ODIs were planned for the traditional rivals of cricket. Up until the first Test in Manchester, Shane Warne had been struggling to secure a permanent place in the Australian team. All that was about to change! No-one was quite prepared for the impact that a 23 year old blonde bombshell was about to make with his first ball in Test cricket on English soil.

England won the toss and invited Australia to bat. With the help of 124 from opener Mark Taylor and 64 from Michael Slater, Australia were dismissed for 289. In reply, England was travelling comfortably at 1/80 when Allan Border called Shane Warne into the attack. Warne was understandably very nervous as he prepared to bowl his first ball to former England skipper, Mike Gatting. Even though he was very nervous, Warne nevertheless gave the ball "a big rip" and hoped that the ball would come out of his fingers correctly. As the ball headed towards Gatting it began to drift down the leg side. Gatting was coming forward to play a defensive push as the ball pitched outside leg stump.


Gatting's look of amazement

The ball suddenly spun viciously past Gatting's probing bat and clipped the off stump. For a moment, Gatting stood frozen. His face revealed a look of utter bewilderment. With a slight shake of the head, Gatting began to walk back to the pavillion in a state of disbelief. He was noticeably confused and unsure of exactly what had just happened.

The ball became known as "the ball of the century." It not only changed Warne's cricket career, but it completely altered the direction of his whole life. From that moment on, Warne became a permanent fixture in the Australian team and his future as a highly paid sportsman was assured.

On that tour, Warne went from strength to strength. He played in all six Tests taking 34 wickets at an average  of 25.79, and scoring 113 runs at an average of 32.66. In all other First Class matches on tour, Warne took another 41 wickets at 19.98. Overall on tour, he took 75 First Class wickets at an average of 22.61. It was to be the beginning of a dominance over English batsmen that would continue for the rest of his career.

It had certainly been a long and bumpy journey from the cricket nets at his old stamping ground in Duncan Street, East Sandringham. But everything changed so dramatically on that June day at Old Trafford, Manchester. It was indeed, the turning point in the career of Shane Keith Warne.

Did Warne wear  more sunglasses during his career  than Imelda Marcos owned shoes?

Warne was a very safe fielder, particularly in slips. He took 125 catches in Tests & 80 in ODIs.

Warne applies pressure against Sri Lanka

The Shane Warne statistics shown below are current up until Warne's retirement from international cricket (January 2007). They do not include any results from Warne's involvement with Hampshire in 2007-2008. Those results will be added to our tables when Shane Warne finally retires from all 1st Class cricket.

Overall Career Bowling Statistics
Status Mat Balls Runs Wkts BBI BBM Ave Econ SR 4 5 10
Tests 145 40705 17995 708 8/71 12/128 25.41 2.65 57.49 48 37 10
ODIs 194 10642 7541 293 5/33 5/33 25.73 4.25 36.32 12 1 0
First-class 286 72201 32970 1269 8/71 . 25.98 2.73 56.89 . 64 11
List A 297 15699 11088 452 6/42 6/42 24.53 4.23 34.73 20 3 0
Twenty20 2 48 51 1 1/29 1/29 51.00 6.37 48.00 0 0 0
 
Overall Career Batting/Fielding Statistics
Status Mat Inns NO Runs HS Ave BF SR 100 50 4s 6s Ct
Tests 145 199 17 3154 99 17.32 5470 57.65 0 12 353 37 125
ODIs 194 107 29 1018 55 13.05 1413 72.04 0 1 60 13 80
First-class 286 385 48 6555 107* 19.45 . . 2 25 . . 247
List A 297 189 35 1819 55 11.81 . . 0 1 . . 119
Twenty20 2 2 0 12 12 6.00 14 85.71 0 0 . . 0
 

Overall Test Career Summary vs Country

VS M R HS Ave 100 50 W BB Ave 5W C
Bangladesh 2 11 6 5.50 0 0 11 5/113 27.27 1 1
England 36 946 90 22.00 0 4 195 8/71 23.25 11 30
ICC World XI 1 12 7 6.00 0 0 6 3/23 11.83 0 0
India 14 309 86 14.71 0 1 43 6/125 47.18 1 10
New Zealand 20 558 99 32.82 0 5 103 6/31 24.37 3 18
Pakistan 15 275 86 16.17 0 1 90 7/23 20.17 6 13
Sth Africa 24 460 63 13.93 0 1 130 7/56 24.16 7 19
Sri Lanka 13 193 35 10.72 0 0 59 5/43 25.54 5 15
West Indies 19 384 47 13.71 0 0 65 7/52 29.95 3 19
Zimbabwe 1 6 6 6.00 0 0 6 3/68 22.83 0 0
Home 69 1533 99 19.16 0 8 319 8/71 26.39 17 71
Away 73 1591 90 16.23 0 4 362 7/165 25.50 20 52
Neutral 3 30 19 7.50 0 0 27 7/94 12.66 2 2
Matches Won 92 1830 86 18.30 0 8 510 8/71 22.47 27 86
Matches Drawn 27 661 99 20.65 0 4 96 6/122 36.08 5 23
Matches Lost 26 663 B B B B B B B B B
Overall 145 3154 99 17.32 0 12 708 8/71 25.41 37 125
 

Warne was sometimes criticized for his strong appeals to the umpire.

Warne had an ideal action that was relaxed and technically near perfect.

 

Overall ODI Career Summary vs Country

VS M R HS Ave 100 50 W BB Ave 5W C
Asia XI 1 2 2* - 0 0 2 2/27 13.50 0 0
Bangladesh 2 - - - - - 2 1/18 25.50 0 0
England 18 108 21 15.42 0 0 22 3/16 33.13 0 8
India 18 109 19 10.90 0 0 15 3/38 56.26 0 5
Kenya 3 15 15 15.00 0 0 3 1/4 25.33 0 1
New Zealand 27 143 29 11.91 0 0 49 4/19 19.24 0 12
Pakistan 22 129 31 12.90 0 0 37 4/33 23.75 0 14
Sth Africa 45 275 55 11.95 0 1 60 4/29 28.63 0 18
Scotland 1 - - - - - 3 3/39 13.00 0 0
Sri Lanka 18 89 36 11.12 0 0 29 3/20 25.72 0 4
West Indies 27 132 29 22.00 0 0 50 5/33 20,90 1 11
Zimbabwe 12 16 11* 16.00 0 0 21 4/34 21.14 0 7
Home 84 338 31 9.65 0 0 134 5/33 24.40 1 45
Away 66 481 55 16.03 0 1 84 4/36 30.41 0 21
Neutral 44 199 30 15.30 0 0 75 4/29 22.88 0 14
Matches Won 124 379 30 13.53 0 0 214 5/33 21.43 1 65
Matches Tied 3 46 19* 46.00 0 0 6 4/29 16.16 0 2
Matches No Result 2 - - - - - 0 - - 0 1
Matches Lost 65 593 55 12.10 0 1 73 4/37 38.52 0 12
Overall 194 1018 55 13.05 0 1 293 5/33 25.73 1 80
 
Test Bowling Analysis: Year by Year
Year O M R W 5w 10w Best Avg S/R E/R
1992 153.3 32 503 12 1 0 7/52 41.92 76.75 3.28
1993 842.2 316 1697 72 2 0 6/31 23.57 70.20 2.01
1994 629 217 1274 70 6 2 8/71 18.20 53.92 2.03
1995 508.3 156 1254 52 1 1 7/23 24.12 58.67 2.47
1996 215.1 55 571 15 0 0 4/95 38.07 86.07 2.65
1997 681.5 194 1661 68 2 0 6/48 24.43 60.16 2.44
1998 268.1 62 796 24 2 1 6/34 33.17 67.04 2.97
1999 464.1 125 1253 38 2 0 5/52 32.97 73.29 2.70
2000 154.2 38 496 15 0 0 4/68 33.07 61.73 3.21
2001 583.3 113 1809 58 4 1 7/165 31.19 60.36 3.10
2002 479 109 1310 67 3 1 7/94 19.55 42.90 2.73
2004 578.4 124 1685 70 5 2 6/125 24.07 49.60 2.91
2005 722.4 141 2114 96 6 2 6/46 22.02 45.17 2.93
2006 474.4 78 1480 49 3 0 6/86 30.21 58.12 3.12
2007 28.4 2 92 2 0 0 1/23 46.00 86.00 3.21
Overall (15) 6784.1 1762 17995 708 37 10 8/71 25.42 57.49 2.65
 

Test Batting Analysis: Year by Year

Year M Inns NO 50s 100s HS Runs Avg Ca St
1992 5 9 1 0 0 35 100 12.50 2 0
1993 16 17 5 1 0 *74 283 23.58 12 0
1994 10 16 1 0 0 33 134 8.93 6 0
1995 12 15 2 0 0 *36 119 9.15 10 0
1996 4 5 0 0 0 33 113 22.60 4 0
1997 15 23 0 1 0 53 360 15.65 7 0
1998 5 8 1 0 0 35 121 17.29 5 0
1999 13 20 2 2 0 86 347 19.28 13 0
2000 4 4 0 0 0 12 36 9.00 5 0
2001 13 16 0 2 0 99 312 19.50 14 0
2002 10 13 1 2 0 63 313 26.08 8 0
2004 12 19 1 1 0 *53 211 11.72 17 0
2005 15 22 2 2 0 90 416 20.80 15 0
2006 10 11 1 0 0 43 218 21.80 7 0
2007 1 1 0 1 0 71 71 71.00 0 0

Overall (15)

145 199 17 12 0 99 3154 17.33 125 0
 

ODI Bowling Analysis: Year by Year

Year O M R W 4w Best Avg S/R E/R
1993 40 2 127 11 2 4/19 11.55 21.82 3.18
1994 273.2 13 1045 50 3 4/34 20.90 32.80 3.82
1995 115.2 14 497 13 0 2/18 38.23 53.23 4.31
1996 151.5 9 583 36 4 5/33 16.20 25.31 3.84
1997 169.3 8 749 23 1 4/37 32.57 44.22 4.42
1998 149.3 3 703 17 0 3/52 41.35 52.77 4.70
1999 329.1 27 1443 62 2 4/29 23.28 31.86 4.38
2000 143 13 563 18 0 3/50 31.28 47.67 3.94
2001 167.5 8 831 32 1 4/48 25.97 31.47 4.95
2002 207.1 13 887 26 0 2/39 34.12 47.81 4.28
2003 20 0 86 3 0 2/58 28.67 40.00 4.30
2005 7 0 27 2 0 2/27 13.50 21.00 3.86

Overall (12)

1773.4 110 7541 293 13 5/33 25.74 36.32 4.25
 

ODI Batting Analysis: Year by Year

Year M Inns NO 50s 100s HS Runs Avg Ca St
1993 5 3 0 0 0 3 6 2.00 1 0
1994 29 14 3 1 0 55 178 16.18 10 0
1995 12 6 4 0 0 21 50 25.00 3 0
1996 16 8 3 0 0 24 49 9.80 6 0
1997 18 15 3 0 0 23 119 9.92 9 0
1998 16 10 4 0 0 19 67 11.17 5 0
1999 37 21 5 0 0 29 204 12.75 10 0
2000 16 9 3 0 0 32 96 16.00 10 0
2001 18 5 1 0 0 18 66 16.50 16 0
2002 24 14 2 0 0 36 181 15.08 10 0
2003 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 0 0
2005 1 1 1 0 0 2* 2   0 0

Overall (12)

194 107 29 1 0 55 1018 13.05 80 0
 

Overall Test W/L Results

vs P Home Away Neut W T D L W%
Bangladesh 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 100
England 36 14 22 0 24 0 5 7 67
ICC World XI 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 100
India 14 5 9 0 8 0 2 4 57
New Zealand 20 11 9 0 12 0 7 1 60
Pakistan 15 9 3 3 11 0 2 2 73
South Africa 24 12 12 0 15 0 5 4 62
Sri Lanka 13 5 8 0 8 0 4 1 62
West Indies 19 12 7 0 10 0 2 7 53
Zimbabwe 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 100

Totals

145 69 73 3 92 0 27 26 63
 

Overall ODI W/L Results

vs P Home Away Neut W L T NR W%
Asia XI 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 100
Bangladesh 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 100
England 18 13 5 0 12 6 0 0 66.67
India 18 1 8 9 10 8 0 0 55.56
Kenya 3 0 2 1 3 0 0 0 100
New Zealand 27 12 9 6 18 8 0 1 69.23
Pakistan 22 10 3 9 12 9 0 1 57.14
South Africa 45 19 20 6 25 18 2 0 57.781
Scotland 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 100
Sri Lanka 18 11 5 2 11 7 0 0 61.11
West Indies 27 13 11 3 17 9 1 0 64.81
Zimbabwe 12 5 3 4 12 0 0 0 100

Total

194 84 66 44 124 65 3 2 65.36
 

Batsmen Dismissed the Most

Test Matches

.

ODIs

Player

Total .

Player

Total
AJ  Stewart (Eng) 14 . DJ  Cullinan (Sth Africa) 8
N  Hussain (Eng) 11 . WJ  Cronje (Sth Africa) 7
AG  Prince (Sth Africa) 11 . Inzamam-ul-Haq (Pak) 6
MA  Atherton (Eng) 10 . CD  McMillan (NZ) 6
MV  Boucher (Sth Africa) 9 . JN  Rhodes (Sth Africa) 6
AF  Giles (Eng) 9 . JC  Adams (WI) 5
SJ  Harmison (Eng) 9 . JH  Kallis (Sth Africa) 5
GP Thorpe (Eng) 9 . CL  Cairns (NZ) 4
AR  Caddick (Eng) 8 . SL Campbell (WI) 4
WJ  Cronje (Sth Africa) 8 . MJ  Greatbach (NZ) 4
R  Dravid (India) 8 . Mohammad Yousuf (Pak) 4
CD  McMillan (NZ) 8 . Moin Khan (Pak) 4
DJ  Richardson (Sth Africa) 8 . AC  Parore (NZ) 4
AJ  Strauss (Eng) 8 . SM  Pollock (Sth Africa) 4
ME  Trescothick (Eng) 8 . HP  Tillakaratne (SL) 4
 

Modes of Dismissal

Test Matches

.

ODIs

Mode of Dismissal

Total .

Mode of Dismissal

Total
Caught 418    . Caught 145  
    "         by Wicket-keeper  73
    "         Caught & Bowled  21
    "         by Fielder 324
  .     "         by Wicket-keeper  21
    "         Caught & Bowled  13
    "         by Fielder 111
 
LBW 138    . Stumped 50   
Bowled 116    . Bowled 49   
Stumped 36    . LBW 48   
Hit Wicket 0    . Hit Wicket 1   

Total

708   

 

Total

293   

 

Shane Warne: Quick Summary

 

Tests ODIs First Class

Matches

145 194 286

Runs scored

3154 1018 6555

Batting average

17.32 13.05 19.45

100s/50s

0/12 0/1 2/25

Highest score

99 55 107 n.o.

Balls bowled

40705 10642 72201

Wickets

708 293 1269

Bowling average

25.41 25.73 25.98

5 wickets in innings

37 1 64

10 wickets in match

10 N/A 11

Best bowling

8/71 5/33 8/71

Catches

125 80 247